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We’ll surely do a proper blog about last night’s Night Shift pub gig soon, but here’s a quick roundup with pictures and your feedback. Huge thanks to everyone who came along – we couldn’t have fitted many more of you in! A full set list will follow shortly.

“this was a great night out “
Bachtrack review

Twitter feedback:

@rubertg: Was at @theoae’s Purcell In The Pub last night. Fabulous evening, sweaty, beery, noisy, tuney. Like being there the first time around.

@katysaustin: Fun, rustic pub ‘n’ Purcell chez @theoae last night; @thoroughlygood as compere.

@kitmonsters: Fab pub gig @theoae setting a new benchmark for vintage kit 😉 + gorgeous tuneage from DJ @rocking_bob @bobpetesarah St Etienne

@paulcampy: fantastic music at #TheNightShift courtesy of @theoae – but a bit of a shame either venue too small or too many tickets sold.

Audience comments

 

Pics (all by Joe Plommer)

16th Century pub

Hopefully there wont be too much of the activity that's going on bottom right...

Next month we’re trying something a little different and taking our late-night series, The Night Shift to everyone’s favourite place – the pub.

It’s an idea we’ve bandied around for a little while here in the OAE office, but recently we decided to JFDI, as we say in our strange office lingo. (Just Flipping Do It)…

The idea is simple, downsize the Night Shift and perform in a pub.  We love the idea of it being a super-intimate event with the audience being really close to performers, and being in a pub, standing, with a pint in hand, should work well with the whole Night Shift informality thing. Plus our Night Shift audience is always telling us they want more regular events – so this is a handy way of having events in between the main shows. Read the rest of this entry »

St George's, Bristol

St George's, Bristol - venue for our lunchtime concerts

One of the recurring fixtures in the OAE’s diary is our annual series of lunchtime concerts at St George’s, Bristol, one of our most regular venues out of London.

There are usually four lunchtime concerts in the series, given by the soloists of the Orchestra, which then go on to be broadcast by BBC Radio 3, and are also often performed elsewhere too – for example as part of our recent Baroque. Contrasted. festival at Kings Place. Indeed, if you scroll down to our April postings you’ll find some info on the composers featured – one example here.

The most recent set of these concerts is being broadcast this week by BBC Radio 3, and the music includes pieces by well known Baroque names such as Bach and Handel, alongside some real rarities. Of course, though they’re broadcast at lunchtime, through the BBC’s Listen Again feature you can listen anytime within a week after the broadcast date.

The BBC also produced a short film to accompany the concerts which features rehearsal footage plus interviews with musicians Margaret Faultless (violin) and Steven Devine (keyboard)

The programmes are being broadcast at 1pm Tuesday to Friday this week, and you can listen to them on the links below:

Tuesday – Refelctions on the Grand Tour – music for Cornetts and Sackbuts
Wednesday – Bach, Handel and Purcell – Wind soloists of the OAE
Thursday – Vivaldi and Corelli – String soloists of the OAE
Friday – Handel, Vivaldi and Coreli – Wind and String soloists of the OAE

Our next Night Shift event is next Wednesday at the Queen Elizabeth Hall, when we’ll be joined by Night Shift regular, conductor Vladimir Jurowski, for a concert of Mahler and Liszt. Support comes from Kitty La Roar and Nick of Time and there’s a DJ set afterwards from Postino. We’ve just released a new podcast ahead of the event and in it we chat to Orchestra leader Maggie Faultless about the music featured, hear from Vladimir Jurowski about his experiences of conducting at The Night Shift, find out how the graphic design and illustration for The Night Shift has evolved and also talk to Natasha, one of our student representatives. You can listen to the podcast below and it will also shortly be available on itunes. Also below is a retrospective of Night Shift flyer designs, to accompany your podcast listening!

The final instalment of backstage pictures of the OAE by Karen Robinson. See some featured around the Southbank Centre site soon as part of a campaign highlighting the new concert season.

More from our series of backstage pictures by Karen Robinson

Continuing our series of pics by Karen Robinson…

Here’s a second set of pics taken backstage around our performance of L’estro Armonico earlier this year, taken by Karen Robinson. This set is from the afternoon rehearsal.

A while back, photographer Karen Robinson was commissioned by Southbank Centre to take pictures of the Resident Orchestras and their major artists, with a view to using the images for the Southbank Centre’s 2010-2011 Classical Music Season. You may well have already seen the photographs in the Southbank’s Classical Music Guide. As part of the project, Karen spent a day with the OAE as we rehearsed and performed Vivaldi’s L’estro armonico at the Queen Elizabeth Hall. The results are fantastic, and a wonderful glimpse into what happens backstage at a concert. Here’s an initial selection (from the afternoon rehearsal), and more will follow.

William Norris, Marketing Director

You may have seen the phrase ‘period instrument orchestra’ floating around in relation to the OAE. Well this means that we use instruments like those from the time that the music was written in so our performances are what the composers themselves would have actually heard. But not only are the instruments the great great grandparents of what you will hear a modern symphony orchestra playing on, the pitch has also changed over the years. Modern orchestras using modern instruments play at a pitch where the note ‘A’ is equivalent to 440 hertz. In Baroque music (Bach and Handel’s time) we generally play at A=415 and for classical music (Mozart, Haydn) at A=430. To give you an idea of the difference, A=415 is about a semi-tone lower than A=440. To the untrained ear, what does this all mean? That if you played the same note on a modern instrument and an ‘old fashioned’ one, that the latter would sound a bit lower. Read the rest of this entry »

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